Holidays of Anubis

The Egyptian Daybook by Tamara L. Siudd

Circle of the Sun: Rites and Celebrations for Egyptian Pagans and Kemetics by Sharon LaBorde

I Akhet 6-7 July 23-24 Feast of Anubis Who is in the Ut

I Akhet 22 August 8Procession of Anubis / Feast of Anubis in Idi

II Akhet 4 August 20 Feast of Gembause / Anubis Inspects the Embalming Tents

II Akhet 24 September 9 Offering-Presentations on the Lake of Anubis (merged with the Festival of Gembause and its procession of Setem priests)

II Peret 1 November 15 Boat Procession of Anubis / Navigation of Anubis; offerings to Amun-Ra and His Ennead

II Peret 17 December 2 It is the day of keeping those things of the pure place (w’abet) of Osiris which have been placed in Anubis’ hands

III Peret 6 January 20 Jubilation of Osiris and Procession of Anubis with adores

IV Peret 2 February 14 Procession of Geb to see Anubis

IV Shomu 22 July 5 Feast of Anubis

Past Anubis Holy Days

It has been a long time since I last posted, so here are some holidays with Anubis that have happened in the last few months

• The Procession of Anubis and His Adorers — III Peret 6* / January 19**

• The Procession of Geb to see Anubis — IV Peret 2* / February 14**

• The Festival of Clothing Anubis — I Shomu 10* / March 25**

* The dates of the holidays according to “The Kemetic Orthodox Festival Calendar” in The Egyptian Prayerbook by Tamara L. Siuda

** The modern dates are given according to the chart labeled “Egyptian Civil Calendar With Modern Dates” in Circle of the Sun: Rites and Celebrations For Egyptian Pagans and Kemetics by Sharon LaBorde

I have stared looking through The Egyptian Daybook by Tamara L. Siuda for more holidays and celebrations associated with Anubis. Hopefully will be able to put that up soon.

And Happy Easter to those who celebrate it!

The Sailing of Mut

Monday afternoon (12/4/17), my dad and I went out for something to eat. We talked about how a lot of Christian holidays are just pagan holidays that were given a Christian make-over. Thus my curiosity was sparked, so I had to read about Yuletide (commonly just called Yule [the term “Yuletide” just means “time; feast-day; period around a holiday”—which answers my dad’s question of “what does Yuletide mean?”]) and Mothers’ Night. When I was reading about Yule and Mothers’ Night, I remembered that I hadn’t done any reading or posts about the Sailing of Mut.

The Sailing of Mut is a Theban festival similar to the Sailing of Hathor. Mut was offered food and unguent jars; ritual libations were poured and much singing singing and drinking were done. Like the Sailing of Hathor, Mut’s festival alludes to her role in the Theban tradition as the Eye of Ra who returns placated from her desert rampage. With the proximity of the festival of the Sailing of Mut to the Winter Solstice, Mut as the Eye of Ra could be celebrated for bringing with Her an eventual return to longer days. (Circle of the Sun: Rites and Celebrations For Egyptians Pagans and Kemetics, Sharon LaBorde)

The various dates for this festival are:

• December 15 (Kemetic Reform / Circle of the Sun: Rites and Celebrations For Egyptian Pagans and Kemetics, Sharon LaBorde / as per 150 days after observing Wep Ronpet as July 18)

• January 2, 2018 (Kemetic Orthodox / as per 150 days after the observing Wep Ronpet in Joliet, Illinois by the Helical Rising of the star Sirius)

• January 7, 2018 (Jackals in the Mountains / as per 150 days after the observing Wep Ronpet in Salt Lake City, Utah by the Helical Rising of the star Sirius)

Mut is the consort of Amun (Following The Sun: A Practical Guide to Egyptian Religion, Sharon LaBorde.) The meaning of Mut’s name is “mother” in Ancient Egyptian. She was also sometimes given the head of a lioness and associated with both Sekhmet and Mertseger.

Now I asked myself: how I can bring Anput into this as well? I thought of this idea to honor Mut for the festival of the Sailing of Mut, but for the winter solstice celebrate Anput as the Eye of Ra for bringing with Her an eventual return to longer days; even worship both goddesses as one synchronized form as Mut-Anput.

Wait, there’s more!

For those interested in figuring out when Wep Ronpet will be for their local area, The Kemetic Temple has an article about the Religious Calendar of Kmt.

Here is what they say about that…

“To determine the date for the beginning of the New Year we need to calculate the precise date that the star Sirius (called ‘Sopdet’ in Egyptian) rises just before sunrise. Sirius had been invisible for some 70 days – which means it arose when the sun had already risen and hence could not be seen by the naked eye due to the illuminated atmosphere.

Today we can utilize a government astronomical website that provides us with the necessary information. Here’s what to do:

Go to http://www.usno.navy.mil

In top toolbar click on ‘Astronomy’

• Then click on Data Services

• Click on Rise/Set/Transit Times for Major Solar System Objects and Bright Stars

• Fill out the required fields, including your location, the star Sirius, and dates from late July to August 14 or later.

• Print a copy of the resulting table of Rise/Set/Transit Times.

• Then go back and fill out the form again, but this time you will select Sun so you can get Rise/Set/Transit Times for the sun.

• Finally, compare the two sets of Times, remembering that you are looking for the first date when Sirius appears BEFORE Civil Twilight.

For example, in the city of San Francisco for 2009, on the date of August 6 Sirius rises at 5.45a and the time for beginning Civil Twilight is 5.49. That means that on that date the human eye will see Sirius just 4 minutes before Twilight begins. Once the suns actually rises at 6.18a it will be far too bright to see the star.

The date of New Year will vary considerably, depending on latitude and longitude in our very large country.

For example, in Miami, Florida, the date for New Year 2009 will be July 27 – and not August 6 as in San Francisco – because Civil Twilight begins at 6.20a and Sirius rises at 6.16a, just four minutes prior.  That means Sirius will be visible for the first time in this season.  On dates prior to July 27 Sirius will be rising after the start of Civil Twilight and Sunrise and hence will not be seen by the naked eye because the sky will be too bright.”

“The Jackal Road – Devotional Driving” by Jackal Sands

I came across this on tumblr and I like the idea. You can find the original here. The following is my wording and take of it.

Things you will need

• a car [or truck] (could be substituted with a bike)

• a navigation system

• gas and gas money

Optionalthings

• snacks

• drinks

• money for snacks and drinks

Step 1

(A) Get in your car.

(B) Take a deep breath.

(C) Listen to the sounds around you for a bit.  This is the beginning of your journey.  You should take a moment to reflect on it.  A mini-meditation in away.

(D) Invite Anubis, or whichever God(s) and/or Goddess(es) that you want, to join you.  Per your flavor of Kemeticism, there can sometimes be a very specific process for honoring and approaching a deity.  This is not one of those times.  Just ask him, or whichever God(s) and/or Goddess(es) that you are wanting to join you. Depending on several factors (your sensitivity to energy, stress you’ve been dealing with, sickness, your level of acquaintance with Anubis) you may or may not feel him there with you.

(E) Trust that he (they) is (are) there with you.

(F) Drive anyway.  This is the “leap of faith” portion of the devotional act, and he may be waiting to see if you’re willing to make it before deciding whether he wants to make his presence better known to you.

Step 2

(A) There’s no destination in mind.  There’s no telling how long you’ll be driving or how far you’ll go.

(B) Turn down any road that seems interesting.  Take highway exits you’ve never gone on.  Turn onto dirt roads you’ve only ever seen out of the corner of your eye.  Buy a coffee from that place you’ve never had time to go to before but were always curious about.

(C) Play music if you want.  Or sit in silence.  Or alternate periods of music and silence.  Maybe talk aloud to Anubis, or to the God(s) and Goddess(es) with you. Do whatever you feel like doing.

(D) This devotional act is about wandering and the freedom that comes with following your instincts (which are more often than not a product of divine interaction).  If you have a lot of trouble just letting go and relaxing and just being and doing…it’s okay.  You can do this too.  Just go wherever the wind takes you.

(E) In all of this pay attention to two things: 1) the laws and conditions of the roadway you occupy and 2) the energy you’re feeling.  What does this drive feel like to you?

(F) All of your feelings are valid.  It’s okay if this doesn’t feel like an incredible epiphany-generating experience!  That’s not what this devotional act is designed to be!  It’s just a way to help you reach out to Anubis, or your God(s) and Goddess(es), and reflect on your relationship with him, or them. If you feel you’re doing that, you’re doing just fine!

(G) If you didn’t feel anything, that’s okay too.  Just try to have a good time and believe that Anubis is glad you’re taking a moment to take care of yourself on your journey through life!

Step 3

(A) When you feel ready, go home.  Use the navigation system (in-built car navigation, Google Maps, whatever map app that you have on your smartphone, or a ye olde map, to get you home safely.  When you get home, step out of your car.  Breath in the air around you.  This is the same home you left, but in some small way, you’ve grown since you’ve left it.  Now it’s time to rejoin the normal world and learn from your experiences during the drive.

(B) Go inside.  Hug your family.  Snuggle your pets.  Drink some water.  Read a book.  Go look at funny pictures of cats. Go to bed.  Do what you want to. The devotional act is done, and your relationship with Anubis or your God(s) and Goddess(es) has grown just as you have.

Note:

Also you don’t have to drive or bike somewhere, you could go for a walk, a run, or a hike and do the same thing.

The Festival of the Celestial Cow (Moomas)

I was reading about The Festival of The Celestial Cow (colloquially called Moomas) by Sedjfaiemitui. It’s a holiday observed mostly by those of the Kemetic Orthodox Faith around the end of December. It falls on Pahenutmut (I Peret) 25, which in Regnal Year 25 of Nisut Hekatawy Reverend Tamara L. Siuda of the Kemetic Orthodox Faith, falls on or around Thursday, December 28, 2017.

Moomas celebrates the exultation of Hathor (and/or Neith) as the Goddess Nut in the form of a great cow or cow-headed deity at the time of Ra’s retirement to the heavens on the back of the Celestial Cow Mehet-Weret. It is rather a somber, if not mournful, holiday, it has taken on some rather spirited Western traditions of secular Christmas.

The background to the Festival of the Celestial Cow in the Book of the Heavenly Cow is the story of the destruction of mankind.

In the myth, it starts out that humans lived among the gods and Ra was the king. Then after some time, Ra began to grow old and mankind started to conspire against Him. After Ra found out about it, He called a meeting with the Gods and Goddesses. It was suggested that he send forth his Eye to punish humanity. And lo, Ra sent His Eye in the form of the goddess Hathor. Hathor was transformed into the lioness goddess Sekhmet. The goddess Sekhmet goes on a rampage and was about to wipe out humanity, but Ra took pity upon humanity. In order to stop Sekhmet, Ra called for beer to be died red to look like human blood. At night the beer was poured into some fields. The following morning, Sekhmet saw the flooded field and thinking that it was human blood, began to drink. After becoming drunk, the goddess fell asleep.

After those events, it was when Ra retired.

Note: Though not all Kemetics observe the same holidays, based on their tradition/cosmology and when they observe Wep Ronpet (Ancient Egyptian/Kemetic New Years). Exempli gratia, in the chapter “A Year of Kemetic Observance” from Circle of the Sun: Rites and Celebrations For Egyptian Pagans and Kemetics by Sharon LaBorde, there is a festival called The Sailing of Mut on 30 Tab’ibet, roughly around December 15, which can work for a seasonal holiday. And in Utah, Wep Ronpet was roughly around August 10 of 2017; so figure August 10 of 2017 plus 145 days for The Festival of the Celestial Cow and we get January 2 of 2018, also add 150 days for The Sailing of Mut thus we get January 7 of 2018. And if you go with a Wep Ronpet date of July 18 of 2017 and you observe the Festival of the Celestial Cow, you would observe it around December 10 of 2017.

—Jackals in the Mountains wish that you and your family have happy and safe holidays this December—

A thought that popped into my head

Do the deities of other faiths/religions look out for people who don’t know them nor worship them?

Do the gods and the goddesses step in and help the other gods and goddesses with their worshipers?

I think that they do.

We may call on a god or goddesses we feel close to help or to listen to what we have on our mind. But another god or goddesses, listens and leaves a note for the god being; or answers the phone, and listens to the prayer till the god being prayed to can come to the phone. In a metaphorical way of looking at.

It would be like Jesucristo* sitting with me holding my hand as Thor holds me up right while I pass a kidney stone (Guys and gals, if you have never had a kidney stone, I hope and pray that you never have one) while Anubis is busy helping elsewhere or taking care of the kidney stone situation while Jesucristo and Thor keep me distracted.

I hope this has made sense to you!

*Spanish for Jesus Christ.